THE AFRICAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES ISSUES FORMAL PROTEST AT THE RACIST REMARKS MADE ABOUT AFRICA, HAITI AND EL SALVADOR BY THE AMERICAN PRESIDENT, DONALD TRUMP

Nairobi, Kenya, 30 January 2018 -

The African Academy of Sciences (AAS) condemns in no uncertain terms the racist remarks made by President Donald Trump about Africa, Haiti and El Salvador. We call upon all National Academies worldwide, members of the Inter-Academy Partnership and the global scientific community to join hands in condemning Trump’s display of overt racism towards Africans, Haitians and El Salvadorians. In this era of globalisation, the world cannot afford such irresponsible statements from a sitting President of the United States of America. Knowledge knows no boundaries and needless-to-say, President  Trump, himself a descendant of migrants, knows just how many millions of well-trained, highly skilled individuals from Africa, Haiti and El Salvador are currently living in America and actively contributing towards the development of that country.

The racially-loaded insult of Africans, Haitians and El Salvadorians serves as a reminder of how America was built on the sweat of slaves from Africa, and how many of them continue to languish in inequality and indignity in the United States of America. No self-respecting President or world leader should spew such racist slurs at a collective of over one billion people in the world.


Despite President Trump’s hostile remarks, the African Academy of Sciences will continue to work closely and on friendly terms with American Research Institutions, Universities, and the warm and wonderful people of the United States of America in the shared purpose of addressing global problems for the common good of humanity.

The African Academy of Sciences aligns itself with the strong sentiments expressed by the African Union, the African Group of Ambassadors to the United Nations in New York, as well as the Secretary General of the United Nations.
 
Professor Felix Dapare Dakora
President, African Academy of Sciences